Sunday, December 27, 2015

A Life in Pictures


Ray Lee Locke was born 27 December 1919 at Portland, Multnomah, Oregon.


He was raised by his father, Joel Shirley Locke in Tacoma, Pierce, Washington. His mother, Dorothy Alice Procter, lived in Portland. His parents divorced when he was about five years old.




As a young person, Ray was popular and active in school events at Lincoln High School in Tacoma. He didn't like to dance, but he was a great roller skater. There used to be a photo of him on skates. He was holding a girl by her ankles and swinging her around. Too bad we can't find that picture. We will have to make do with the motorcycle photo.


He is the "big eye" person in our family tree. Ray had black hair and brown eyes. He was just five feet four inches tall.


Ray married Betty Jane Boucher on 20 April 1941 at Kent, King, Washington. They were married by a minister friend of Ray's. He was always active in church groups as well as at school.



Ray worked at the shipyards for a time, but eventually enlisted in the Army during World War II. He served in the Philippines, and in Japan.


When Ray returned home, he worked for the Post Office, first as a clerk, and then as a supervisor and route manager. He loved animals and always had a dog or two. He is with his father in this picture.



Ray and Betty had two children, Judith and Richard. This photo was taken in 1957.
It was an important year because the family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. This particular Thanksgiving, the missionaries who taught our family were guests for dinner. Ray and Betty learned about the church because two missionaries stopped by the house. Normally, they would not have found them home, but Judy and Dick were having their tonsils removed, so they were home that day. That was the beginning of several months association with the Elders. As a family, we were all baptized on 1 June 1957.


This picture was taken in 1959 when the family drove to Salt Lake City, Utah to attend the temple and be united as an eternal family. It was a big trip, and an important one.

Ray was a get it done kind of person, very organized. He was always busy. He had a sharp wit and a good sense of humor. He built an upstairs on our home, and lost his thumb doing it. He kept the house and yard in immaculate condition. He enjoyed reading and loved cars; his was pristine. I remember, as a girl, listening for rattles while he drove. He couldn't stand rattles; I still listen. He looked forward to the Seattle Seafair and the hydroplane races each year. He loved the speed.

When he was older, he thought his age gave him license to say what he thought, which he often did. He could be abrasive. Ray had two bypass surgeries. At the time of the second surgery, he said that if he could gain another good ten years from it, that would be good. If he couldn't, he would rather just not wake up. And that's what he got. The surgery was a success, but the patient did not revive. Ray died on 16 March 1995, in Tacoma. I felt like I ought to be able to walk into another room and ask, "So, how was it?" But I could not.


When he died, I felt peaceful and good about him and his life. On the Monday before his death, he came home from his walk and said he needed to see the doctor. After that, things moved along until the surgery. It was the same surgeon as before, and when he came into the waiting room, he cried. Before entering the hospital, Dad ran down to church to do a couple of chores. He was the executive secretary of the Singles Ward. He left nothing undone, and so he died, all assignments complete. That was like him to finish everything up before leaving.

Saturday, December 26, 2015

John Procter of Yorkshire and Oregon




John Procter was born on 26 December 1868 at Doncaster, Yorkshire, England. His parents were Henry Procter and Mary Ann McCabe. They had a large family, and John was the oldest surviving child. Emily and George, born before him, only lived a few months. Altogether, there were fourteen children born to this family. John was the only one who left England. There is still one unidentified child for this family.













John and Emily Gourd were married at Doncaster on 19 January 1890. He was a printer by trade, and always made a good living. They lived in at least six houses during a ten year period before leaving England. Although they would not be considered anything special now, they were new and very nice at the time. All of these houses are located within a very small area of York, and within the same parish.


John and Emily had a large family. Their children were Walter, Percy, Gert, Dorothy, Cecil, Berniece (called Lu), Doug, and Evelyn Maud. Dorothy is our ancestor. Everyone was born in Doncaster except for Doug, who was born in 1913 in Vancouver, British Columbia; and Maud, who was born in 1915 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon. In August of the same year, their oldest son, Walter, was killed on the Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey, during World War I. He was a soldier in the Australian Imperial Forces. They lost their youngest daughter in 1922, leaving them with six remaining children. Seated in this photo are Percy, Emily and John, Gert, and Dorothy; standing behind are Cecil, Berniece (Lu), and Doug.

John was an avid golfer. He was a stern man, who, in his later years could be called "a sweet old man." He possessed a charming nature. As a child, I remember visiting at their home. The adults visited and we children sat outside on their porch in the big porch swing that looked like a couch with a canopy. Great-grandfather John believe that children should be seen and not heard, so it was a quiet time visiting at their house.

John died on 23 April 1953 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon. In 1967, when our family (Locke) visited Emily, his wife, she said, with tears in her eyes, that she still missed him so very much.

Friday, December 18, 2015

Elisha Boucher, Loving Father


Elisha Boucher was born in Clay County (now Laurel County and home of the Colonel Sanders Cafe), Kentucky (A) on 18 December 1821. His parents were William and Mary Anna Gray Boucher. William was from Virginia. In 1830, he was listed on the census for London Post Office, Kentucky. Since the Wilderness Road passed directly through London, it was a gathering place for homes, stores, churches, the post office, and a local blacksmith shop.

1830 was the year Congress passed the Indian Removal Act authorizing the federal government to relocate the Indian tribes, moving them west of the Mississippi into the designated Indian Territory in Oklahoma and parts of Kansas and Nebraska. In the fall and winter of 1838-39, Cherokees of the Tennessee River area were marched to their new location along a 1200-mile route appropriately called the Trail of Tears, or in their language, "nunna-da-ul-tsun-yi," translated, "the place where they cried." In Meigs County, Tennessee, some traveled by riverboat or steamboat, and avoided the dreaded Trail of Tears.

When the Cherokee lands became available for settlement, William took advantage of the opportunity. On the 1840 census, he and his family were living in Meigs County, Tennessee (B). They may have traveled down the Wilderness Road and through the Cumberland Gap, their wagons loaded with their possessions. William's sister, Elizabeth, and her husband, Joseph McSpadden, were also living along the Tennessee. At the time, Elisha was nineteen, Gadi was sixteen, Nancy was thirteen, Kiziah was eleven, Robert was eight, John was six, and Temperance was just four.

Elisha married Hester McClanahan on 6 Nov 1845, probably in Meigs County or a nearby county in Tennessee. They had four children- Anna Jane, born 23 August 1846; William Robert, born 21 February 1848; Amanda Malvina born August 1852; and Samuel White, born 22 April 1854. Samuel is our ancestor.

In 1850, Elisha and Hester were living next door to his parents, William and Anna. It is interesting that he named his first two children Anna Jane and William. On the 1860 Limestone, Meigs County census, Elisha was still living next door to William. Elisha's personal property was valued at $375, while William had property worth $2000 and personal property of $942. It appears that William owned the land and they worked together to farm it. Since elementary education began in Meigs County in the 1830's the children had the advantage of a basic education. Religion was either Methodist or Baptist, and the Bouchers favored the Methodists.

Elisha served in the Union Army during the Civil War. He was a corporal of Captain James L. Duncan's Company, Fifth Regiment of the Tennessee Infantry Volunteers. He enrolled on 1 April 1862 and was discharged on 11 May 1865 at Nashville, Tennessee. His papers list his birthplace as Laurel County, Kentucky. He was five feet nine inches tall and had a fair complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. He was a farmer when he enrolled in the military. Elisha's brothers also enlisted. Elisha was not a young man, but a family man in his middle years, who had to leave his home and family to serve.

When the war ended, Meigs County was like a desert wasteland. Being on the Tennessee River, both armies had marched back and forth regularly, using up all the resources available. Farms were vacant, lands uncultivated, and large numbers of families left to find a better place to live. Even the fences were gone, having provided firewood for camping troops.What the Bouchers had, were their men back, all of them.

On 24 February 1867, Elisha's daughter Anna Jane, married Joseph Romine in Bradley County, next door to Meigs County. He was also a native of Meigs County.

On 26 April 1870, Elisha deeded 135 acres of land in Meigs County to Robert Boucher. Then he took his family who were still living at home and joined a wagon train to Missouri. They started their trip on May 2nd. Along the way, he wrote letters to his children in Tennessee, telling them of the trip and encouraging them to also move to Missouri so that the family could remain together. He had a good team and wagon, and the resources, probably from the sale of his land, to pay the necessary fees and costs along the way. Their destination was Howell County, Missouri, where Joseph and Hannah McClanahan Bracket lived. Hannah was a sister of his wife, Hester. One such letter was written on 15 May from Sumner County, Tennessee and is included here. Punctuation and capitalization have been added for easier reading, but the spelling is as he wrote it.

Dear son and daughter, with pleasur I take the present opportunity of writing you a few lines to let you know that we are well at present, hoping these few lines may reach you and find you all well and doing well. We started the 2nd day of May. We have been hindered some on the way. There is 7 waggons in our train. Miller has 4 and George Russel one, Martin Turner one and me one. We are 9 miles past Galiton on the Red River road. My expences has been more than I expected. Turnpikage cost me 25 cts evry 5 mile. I paid 435 turnpikes, feed for my team cost about 125 cts per day, beside the family. We travel from 14 to 18 miles a day. The fore part of las week was very wet. We got our thing wet. We are resting to day and suning our things that is wet.
Well I want you to write us and direct your letter to Joseph Brackett, West Plains PO, Howel Co, Misouri so we can hear from you as soon as we get there. We expect to stop in Howel Co and look at the country. If we like and can get land to suit us we will stop there. If not we will go further.
Well Jo, I want you and Jane to not go to any expence to fix for housekeeing untell you find out how things is in Misouri. If I like in MO I want you to come. Billy will come. Harry and Manda says they will come next fall. I want all my children together where I can see them once more. That is one cause of my sellout and move. It is ahard toil on me and Hetty.
We have 2 good yoke of young steers and a good waggon. We are getting along tollerable well. Will rest evry Sunday if we can get feed for our stock so we can stay. I wrote to Mandy last Sunday.
Well Jane, your mother is taking a great toil on herself to try to get to her children. Says she don't know how she can stand it tell fall and not see you and the children and Billy, but I don't see any chance for her to see you before fall. I will not have money enough to bear my expence further than Misouri. I will write to you when I get to MO and I will tell you what I think that country.
If I have no bad luck and you want to come to us I will come after you with my waggon. I have a good cover and tent cloth so we can sleep dry of a wet night. Write soon as you get this. I want to hear from you as soon as we get to Jo Bracket's. So I must close for this time. I have to write a letter to Billy to day.
Elisha & Hester Boucher to Jo & A. J. Romines-
Show this to Fate and Frank."

Elisha died on 14 March 1871 in Missouri. On the 1876 state census, his wife, Hester, was living with her son, Samuel. All of their children did come to Missouri. Joseph and Anna Jane Romine had six children and eventually settled in Willow Springs, Howell, Missouri. Amanda and Harrison Hickman, who were neighbors in Tennessee, married on 20 March 1870 in Missouri. They were living near Hester on the 1876 census in Texas County, Missouri (C). They had a large family of nine children and settled in Crawford County, Missouri.


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William married Alberta Moore on 17 March 1878 in Texas County and they had three children. And Samuel married Rossea Whitlock on 27 May 1877, also in Texas County. She was a divorced woman with a daughter named Pearl. They had three sons, one of them our ancestor, Arthur; and also ended up in Willow Springs. So Elisha had his wish to have all of his children around him. As did Hester, who died on 23 May 1879. Of his four children, three named a son Elisha.

Saturday, December 12, 2015

Joseph Sealy of Chudleigh


This is taken from the 1851 census for Chudleigh, Devonsire, England,
Joseph Sealey, head, married, 73, Chelsea pensioner, born Chudleigh, Devon; Elizabeth, wife, age 79, born at Hennock; William Bolt, son-in-law, age 52, house servant, born Powderham; Sarah Bolt, daughter, age 51, dressmaker, born Chudleigh; John Sealy Bolt, grandson, unmarried, age 25, journeyman carpenter, born Chudleigh; Mary Ann Bolt, granddaughter, unmarried, age 16, at home, born Chudleigh; William Bolt, grandson, age 11, scholar, born Chudleigh.

Census records like this are a treasure because they tie people together. From this record we learn where Joseph and his wife, Elizabeth were born. That is helpful for further research. We also find out about his daughter, Sarah, and her family. There are three generations living together in this household! Their address was 15 Culver Street.

Parish records tell us that Joseph was born 12 December 1779 and christened on 10 January 1780. His parents were Philip and Grace Sealy. He had at least one sibling, a sister named Betty. While we don't know when he died, we do know that it was after the 1851 census. Since Sarah was born in 1800, we can estimate Joseph and Elizabeth's marriage at 1799. Not having an actual marriage record, we do not know her maiden name. It is likely they were married at her home of Hennock, but it could also have been at Chudleigh, it being a "thriving metropolis." The distance between these two places is a staggering 3.5 miles, Hennock being on the west side of the River Teign, and Chudleigh on the east. Hennock is a small moorland village, recorded in the Domesday Book, and situated just inside the SE edge of the Dartmoor National Park, with tremendous views over the rolling countryside. Chudleigh was featured in an earlier post in September.

Thursday, November 26, 2015

John Pinder

Our last known November birthday is that of John Pinder, the son of Joseph Pinder and Ann Ryel. His christening took place at Doncaster, Yorkshire, England on 26 November 1788, just a little over a year after his parents were married, also at Doncaster. He had a younger brother and sister, Noah and Mary.

On 31 October 1808, he married Jane Butter or Butler. Together they raised a large family at Doncaster, where all of the children were christened. They were John, Joseph, Thomas, Sarah, Sarah, Norah, George and Harriett. There was another John Pinder at Doncaster with a wife named Jane, but with a different surname. It could be the same Jane, or not. This needs to be sorted out.

And that's all we know. If you look at other postings for Yorkshire, you can get a feel for the area and its beauty.

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Matthew Gourd of Liskeard in Cornwall

Liskeard (Cornish: Lys Kerwyd or Lyskerrys), pronounced Lis-KARD, is an old stannery (tin mining) and market town, lying at the head of the River Looe Valley. This description is found at Cornwall-online, "To the north west of Liskeard lies the windswept uplands of Bodmin Moor, a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The moors, shrouded in mist and mystery, hold abundant clues for those who want to delve into the past - burial chambers and holy wells, giant stones and Bronze Age settlements, decayed mine-workings and disused quarries. When you visit the moors you are retreading the footsteps of Neolithic man, of Cornish Kings, and of the thousands of miners who once worked the area." Liskeard was granted its market charter by Richard, Earl of Cornwall (brother of Henry III) in 1240. It was an ancient place long before Matthew Gourd, the son of Sampson and his wife, Jane Calloway, was christened on 17 November 1758. There is still a traditional weekly market in Liskeard today.

Matthew married Elizabeth Parker on 1 April 1779 at Christow, Devonshire, England, her birthplace. Their marriage record states, "Mathew Gourd of the Burrough of Liskeard in the County of Cornwall Gardiner & Elizabeth Parker of this Parish Spinster were married in this Church by Licence this first day of April 1779 by me William Hill Curate." Matthew and Elizabeth both signed the record. Witnesses were Richard Parker, Elizabeth Balle and William Roleston.


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Christow is located 54 miles NE of Liskeard, and on the other side of the Dartmoor area, now a National Park. When I look at the map, I wonder, "Which way did they go?" Did they go north or south around the area, or straight through, which would have decreased the distance they had to travel, but may have been a more difficult trip.

Matthew and Elizabeth had a large family that included Mary, William, Betsey, Sampson, John Parker, Matthew, Matthew, and Jane. All of the children were christened at Liskeard, where the family made their home, except the last two. Matthew and Jane were christened at Linkinhorne, just nine miles NE of Liskeard. Linkinhorne has a very nice parish history site. There is a medieval church at Linkinhorne. There are also some ancient wall paintings of "The Seven Works of Mercy," considered to be some of the best. There is also a nice introduction to English Medieval Wall Painting. They don't have anything to do with Matthew and Elizabeth unless you consider that they may have been interested in them, because they would have been interesting then, as well as now.

As stated in his marriage record, Matthew made his living as a gardener. Matthew's son, John Parker, is our ancestor.

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Joel Shirley Locke, Sign Painter

Joel Shirley Locke was born in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota on 4 November 1886. He was named Joel after his grandfather, but his family called him Shirley. His parents were Charles L. Locke and Mittie Alice B. Duffy. He had an older brother, John Henry, who was about two when he was born. When Joel was two years old, his only sister, Jessie Alice, was born. She lived just one year. Then in 1891, Marion Damon was born. The family lived at Annandale in Wright County, Minnesota at the time. In 1899 when Joel was thirteen, his mother died in Minneapolis. On the 1900 census he was a student at the Minnesota State Training School at Red Wing, Goodhue, Minnesota. It was about 54 miles SE of Minneapolis, where his father lived and worked. That may have been a difficult time for him, having lost his mother and being away from home.

Joel married Dorothy Alice Procter on 19 February 1919. He was 32 years old and fourteen years older than Dorothy. They lived in Portland, Oregon, and drove the bridge across the Columbia River to Vancouver, Clark, Washington to be married. They had two sons while living in Portland, Ray and David. The photo of Joel and Dorothy with Ray was taken in 1920 at Multnomah Falls. In about 1924, Joel and Dorothy divorced. Joel took Ray, the older of the two boys and not yet five years old, and moved to Tacoma, Pierce, Washington. David stayed in Portland with his mother.


In the above photo, Ray is sitting in the car. Notice the logo for "Locke and Keys Signs" on the side of the vehicle. The photo at the right shows three generations--C. L. Locke (Joel's father), Ray, and Joel. Double click on the photo for a better look.

In 1925 Joel married briefly, and it must have been a mistake from the beginning. The marriage was so short that Ray didn't even know about it. On the 1930 census Joel was 42 years old and living in a boarding house in Tacoma. He was a sign painter. Ray, aged ten, was living in another boarding house with a widow named May Greenleaf, who took care of him. It being during the Great Depression, times could be difficult. At one point Joel went to California to try to get work in Long Beach. While he was there, they had an earthquake. It was so upsetting to him that he returned to Tacoma and stayed there. As an adult, Ray remembered that when times were good, their needs were met; but when Joel was out of work, they suffered. Joel did his best to provide for Ray. This is a good look at father and son together. It was just the two of them for many years.


Joel married Ruth Elinor Anderson on 5 January 1933 in Port Orchard, Kitsap, Washington. It was her first marriage. They had one son, Daniel, in 1934.


Each summer Joel took his boys to eastern Washington to Soap Lake. That was something everyone enjoyed. He loved his children, and kept an album of their times together. This is Ray, Dan, and David together on one of their Soap Lake vacations. The handwriting is Joel's.

This picture shows Joel, at the right, when he was older. He is with his son, Ray, who is my father. Joel died on 22 January 1943 in Tacoma. He is buried in the Old Tacoma Cemetery.

Saturday, October 31, 2015

The Many Lives of Dorothy


My grandmother, Dorothy Procter, was small, with dark hair and eyes. She lived in Portland, Oregon when I was a girl and we visited her regularly. The rest of her family always remarked that I looked just like her. I am not so sure about that, except for the small and dark part. In their British way, they called her Dor-o-thy, in three separate syllables. It seems as though her life was lived in separate sections or phases, hence the title of this memory of her.



This is a picture of where her family lived in 1900. I am told that it would have been a very nice home at the time. She was born in York, Yorkshire, England on 31 October 1900 to John Procter and Emily Gourd, his wife. York has an interesting history extending back to Roman times, and Yorkshire is considered to be the "greenest" area in England. It is an area of beautiful landscapes, castles and abbeys, and was an independent Viking kingdom for a time; all of these things giving it a rich and interesting history. Since Dorothy was born in 1900, that part was over by the time she arrived on the scene. To see some photos of the city of York, click here.


Dorothy's family immigrated to Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada sometime between 1909 and 1913. In addition to Dorothy, the children at that time were Walter, Percy, Gert, Cecil, and Berniece. While the family was living in Canada, Doug was born in 1913. Shortly after that they moved to Portland, Multnomah, Oregon, where her father worked as a printer. Her sister, Evelyn Maud was born there in 1915. They certainly picked beautiful places to live. This is a picture of Dorothy, Gert, and Berniece (Lu) with their mother, Emily.

Dorothy married Joel Shirley Locke on 19 February 1919. They crossed the Columbia River to Vancouver, Clark, Washington to be married. He was fourteen years older than his new wife. They had two sons, Ray and David, while living in Portland. Ray, my father, is our ancestor.



In about 1924, Joel and Dorothy divorced. Ray moved to Tacoma, Pierce, Washington with his father and David stayed in Portland with his mother. This is a picture of Dorothy with her mother and David.















She sent pictures to Ray and wrote notes on the back of them. It is hard to see since it was written in pencil, but it shows her handwriting, and also something she did to maintain contact with her son.



Dorothy was briefly married to Ralph Lucas. She next married Earl Moses, to whom she was married for fifteen years. Earl was eleven years older than Dorothy. In this photo Dorothy and Earl, at the right, are with her sister, Gert, and her husband, Frank Lamb.



In her later years, Dorothy married Dwight Skaggs, who I knew as Little Grandpa. I think they were married by 1950. He was very good to her, particularly at the end of her life when she was sick. She was an alcoholic who died from complications associated with that.



Each Christmas she sent us a pair of knitted gloves. I remember her sitting on her couch with blankets wrapped around her legs. They lived at Milwaukee, outside of Portland. And there we are, my brother and me, with our "Little Grandma." She died on 9 January 1955.

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Mary Potbury of Powderham


Powderham has an interesting history, complete with a castle, and was mentioned in the Domesday Book. The Devon Library has a nice map and description of Powderham.

On 29 October 1769, Mary Northam Potbury, "base child" of Sarah, was baptized. The significance of this entry is that Mary was illegitimate. Her mother was 32 years old when she was born and no record of a marriage for her mother has been found. She was born at Powderham, Devon, England. She married William Bolt there on 4 October 1797. They remained in Powderham where they had four children named William, Thomas, Ann and Martha. William is our ancestor.

Mary grew up in the shadow of this castle. Castle owners, the Courtenay family of her time, had a large family of 13 girls and one son. It is unlikely that Mary had contact with this family, whose life is so well documented, unlike her own. In fact, we know more about the castle than we do about Mary!

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Mary Jane Robbins

Mary Jane was born 15 Oct 1827/1829 in Ohio or New Jersey, depending on which record you choose to use as a source. It's probably a toss up since she could have been born in New Jersey and grown up in Ohio, or her parents were from New Jersey and she was born after their move to Ohio.

Many of the Robbins people who lived in that area were from New Jersey. You would think that would make the job easier, but that's not the case. When I found a Robbins will listing a daughter named Jane Lock, I was thrilled, thinking I had found my girl with her parents. Nevertheless, I persisted in investigating since there was also an Alvis Lock married to a Jane. You know what happened. I proved that that Jane was the Jane who was married to Alvis. And I still don't know who Mary Jane's parents are.

She married William F. Lock on 19 August 1947 in Randolph County, Indiana, which is at the Indiana-Ohio border, making it more difficult to search for records since both states have to be considered.

In August of 1850, the little family, including their two baby daughters, was living in Somers, Preble, Ohio, about forty miles SE of Randolph County. This census enumeration explains Sarah Caroline's birthplace of Ohio. All of the other children were born in Randolph County, Indiana. Finding this particular census opens the possibility that Mary Jane's family was from Preble County. Levi Lock, who was living with them, does not appear again, so he remains a mystery at this time. He is a clue, waiting to be discovered.

William F. Lock, age 23, M, laborer, NC; Mary, age 19, F, NJ; Margaret, age 1, F, IN; Sarah, age 4/12, F, OH; Levi Lock, age 17, M, IN.

By November, they were back in Randolph County and were living in Greens Fork, the township located in the most SE corner of the county.
William F. Lock, age 21, M, wagon maker, NC; Mary A. Lock, age 21, F, OH; Margaret Lock, age 2, F, IN; Caroline Lock, age 5/12, F, IN.

In 1860, the family had grown again, and they were living in Washington, just five miles west of Greens Fork.
William F. Lock, age 32, M, blacksmith, /$100, NC; Mary J. Lock, age 32, F, NJ; Margaret A. Lock, age 12, F, IN; Sarah C. Lock, age 10, F, IN; Alvis M. Lock, age 8, M, IN; Joel J. Lock, age 4, M, IN; Charles H. Lock, age 2, M, IN.

Sometimes you wonder why people said what they said to census enumerators. They lied about all kinds of things, or were careless in their responses. The enumerators were also a mixed group, some being meticulous in their entries, and others hurrying along and making mistakes. Did Mary Jane list her birthplace as Ohio in 1850 because she had most recently come from there? When in Ohio did she say New Jersey because that's where her family lived previously? Who knows! Who knows!

By 1870, their family was complete, and several of the children had already left home. They were still living in Washington.
Wm. F. Locke, age 49, M, blacksmith, $150/50, NC; Mary J. Locke, age 38, F, W, keeps house, NJ; Joel J. Locke, age 13, M, IN; Charles M. Locke, age 11, M, IN; William F. Locke, age 8, M, IN; Sherman Locke, age 5, M, IN; Minna Locke, age 3, F, IN.

Mary Jane died on 14 November 1872 and was buried at New Liberty Cemetery in Lynn. Since they stayed in the same area for the entire life of their marriage, we have a picture of them every ten years. What we do not have is personal information about Mary Jane. We do not know her parents' names, her brothers and sisters, what she liked to do with her time, or even how she looked. We know her as a wife and as a mother. She was the mother of eight children and her household would have reflected that. They were not wealthy people, so she probably did all of her own housework while raising her children. Thus, her short life was a busy one.

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

The Pinder Procter Connection

If you look for Yorkshire histories at the left, you will see that there is a nice description of Doncaster and a good map of the places Sarah Pinder lived under the posting for her husband, John Procter, who she married on 6 September 1841 at Rotherham, a good place to go to be married because of its many churches.

John Pinder and his wife, Jane Butter, are credited with two daughters named Sarah. This normally happened when the older child died and the parents used the name again when another child of the same gender was born. In this case, the two Sarah's ages are two years apart. The first was christened on 13 October 1819, and the second on 24 January 1821, both at Doncaster. Normally, one would assume that the first Sarah was deceased. In this case, the Sarah who married John Procter was 32 years old on the 1851 census for Doncaster, setting her birth at 1819. Both of the christening dates were extracted from church records by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. There could actually be two Sarahs or just one, with different christening dates recorded. One could be a correction. Or, these two girls could have had different names, but one was recorded incorrectly. We cannot know. But we do know when Sarah Pinder married John Procter and that she is a grandmother for us. And we further know that she was the daughter of her parents, John and Jane.

Sarah's married life matches that of her husband as follows--
On 6 September 1841, John married Sarah Pinder, the daughter of John Pinder and Jane Butler, his wife. They married at Rotherham, located about thirteen miles SW of Doncaster. That would have been a big trip for them. Their first son, Henry, was born in 1842 at Cantley, which is about three miles east of Doncaster. John is our grandfather, six generations back for my children. Their five other children were born at Doncaster, where they made their home for the rest of their lives. Their four girls were M. (name unknown), Jane, Mary Ann, and Lucy. Their last child was John, born in 1859, which is about the time Sarah died, perhaps in childbirth.


Sarah, if she was born in 1819, would have been about 40 years old when she died. She had a relatively short life, proving once again, that childbearing was a perilous business in earlier times.

Monday, October 5, 2015

Bennett Murray of Fredericktown, Missouri

I devoted many research years to Bennett Murray. It was complicated by the existence of several other men of the same name. One, in particular, lived in an adjoining county and was about the same age as our Bennett. His descendants had a story about his parentage. It was that his father "crossed the river" and married his mother. Then he "went back across the river" to his own people and did not return. So his mother named him Bennett Murray after his father. This implies that Bennett Murray was also his father's name. I've never found anything to indicate the reality of this story, nor do I have any reason to doubt it either. These two Bennett Murrays could even be half brothers in the whole scheme of things; or they could be cousins. Since I have had no luck in locating Bennett's father, it remains a mystery waiting to be solved.

According to Lota Murray Campbell's family Bible, our Bennett Murray was born 5 October 1820 in Fredericktown, Madison, Missouri. Missouri was acquired from the French in 1803 through the Louisiana Purchase. Missouri became a territory in 1812 and a state in 1821, so this was truly the frontier at the time. Sometime in the 1950's, Lota Murray Campbell received a letter from another branch of the family who wanted to exchange information. Unfortunately, that never happened and the letter didn't have anything in it to identify this family. Family tradition is that he was from a large family of brothers who were divided in their loyalties at the time of the Civil War. It is unfortunate that we do not have an 1820 census for Missouri. It might have helped us sort these people out. The state of Missouri has a nice historical timeline.

Bennett's Volunteer Enlistment into the Civil War contained many facts pertinent to his life. It was made at Rolla, Phelps, Missouri on the 6th day of August in 1862. He stated that he was forty years old and a farmer. He was five feet eleven inches tall and had gray eyes and dark hair. He was a man in his forties who was leaving his family to fight a war; not for choice, but for duty.

When he applied for his pension in 1898, he listed his marriages on the application. He was first married to Mary J. Barnes in Madison County, he said 1840. The day book of the Reverend Elias White sets the date at 8 June 1845. She died the next year. Mary Jane was the daughter of Samuel and Mary Barnes from North Carolina.

Bennett's second marriage was to Susan Perkins, and he noted that she died November, 1845, also in Madison County. In actuality, their marriage was recorded in Washington County, Missouri on 6 July 1848. Their daughter Sarah A. Murray, was born 4 November 1850. It is obvious that Susan died from complications related to the birth of their daughter. Efforts to locate Bennett on the 1850 census have not been successful. There is one possibility for Susan's parents, but it is also uncertain at this time.

At this point, Bennett was a young father who had lost two wives to death, and now had a small baby daughter. It appears he had his share of grief. His third marriage was to Olive Wood. His pension papers list the date of 10 January 1846, with a notation that she died in July, 1882. That cannot be right since Sarah was born in 1850 and Olive, age 17, was living with her parents on the 1850 census. This date has also been adjusted to accommodate other information available to us. The accepted date of their marriage is 10 January 1851, just after Susan's death. Bennett gets credit for remembering the day correctly, and the year has been adjusted based on the birth of Sarah and the 1850 census enumeration for Olive.

Bennett and Olive raised a large family of boys in addition to baby Sarah. Our ancestor, John Lewis, born 13 June 1854, was the oldest. His brothers were Francis Marion, James Henry, Bennett, Thomas Franklin, William Elisha and Ora. All of the boys were born in Missouri, except James Henry, who was born in Arkansas. That's interesting because there were Murrays living in Arkansas with similar family names. It may be that they were with some of their extended family at the time since tradition says some of them were in Arkansas, and their Missouri home was not farm from the border between Missouri and Arkansas.

In 1859 Bennett purchased land in Dent County, Missouri, about 85 miles west of their home town of Fredericktown. That is where his family lived during the Civil War. As was mentioned previously, Bennett enlisted in the Union Army on 6 August 1862. His military service was outlined by Herbert Campbell. He was enrolled at Benton Barracks, near St. Louis, Missouri, in Captain Joe Davis' Company on 20 October of that same year. He was paid $2 premium and $25 enlistment bounty. He served most of the time in Company C, 32nd Regiment, Missouri Infantry, and in Company D, Consolidated Battalion, 31st and 32nd Missouri Infantry. Bennett's regiment was in General Sherman's YAZOO Expedition from 22 December 1862 to 3 January, and in the assault and capture of Fort Hindeman, Arkansas Post, January 10-11. Bennett's regiment moved to Young's Point, Madison County, Louisiana about 15 miles from Vicksburg, Warren, Mississippi, and across the Mississippi River, with the Army of the Tennessee.

Bennett left camp on 20 March 1863, and apparently went home to see Bennett, Jr., who was born on January 25th of that year, and to help with the spring planting. He was placed on the Desertion List to the Provost General, dated 21 April 1863. He was arrested in May and taken to the Provost Marshall in Rolla, Missouri. From there he was sent to St. Louis, Missouri in the charge of Lt. White's Provost Guard on June 22nd. He returned to Company C, operating around Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi, and was with the Army on the Tennessee on 9 July. He was charged with desertion, "did desert said service on or about the 20 March 1863 at or near Youngs Point, Louisiana and remained absent from his command until on or about the 17th July 1863, at which time he voluntarily rejoined his command. Since which time he has been a good and obedient soldier," but was not court martialed until 1865. As was often the case, men would leave their duty to go home to take care of family business and then return to their service.

Bennett's regiment had nearly twenty times as many casualties from disease as from combat. This was undoubtedly due to lack of knowledge of proper sanitation and living and fighting along rivers and swamps. Bennett was admitted to USA Hospital Steamer, Charles McDougall on 5 September 1863 from Vicksburg with an intestinal fever. He was transferred 8 September to Overton USA General Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee with atrophy of the testicles. On 19 September, he was again transferred to USA Hospital Steamer, Memphis with mumps. On 23 September, he was transferred to the USA General Hospital, Jefferson barracks, near St. Louis, Missouri with a lame back. He returned to duty on 30 November. He was sick again on 22 December at Bridgeport, Alabama and admitted to Cumberland USA General Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee on 23 December 1863. The complaint was rheumatism, with an added diagnosis on inflamed bronchi. Following all of this illness, he was furloughed from 12 February to 14 March. He was then transferred to Brown USA General Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky on 15 April, with a diagnosis of chronic rheumatism. He was detailed to Ward 9 on 21 May, and returned to duty 8 October 1864.

After Bennett's return to duty, his regiment was in the operation against Confederate General Hood in northern Georgia and Alabama until 3 November. Due to losses, the 32nd Regiment was consolidated to a battalion of three companies and further consolidated with three companies, the 31st Missouri Infantry as consolidated Battalion 31st and 32nd Missouri Infantry. General Sherman instructed the army's surgeons to examine every man with a history of illness to be sure they would be able to make it all the way to Savannah, Georgia. No man was retained who was not capable of the long march. No one anticipated that the route would be to our nation's Capitol, over 1000 miles, and would require over six months. They crossed mountains, rivers, and swamps and fought numerous battles in General Sherman's March to the Sea, and in operations in the Carolinas and Virginia against Confederate General J. E. Johnston. (General Robert E. Lee surrendered 27,800 Confederate troops to General U. S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on 9 April.) General Johnston surrendered 31,200 troops to General Sherman on 18 April 1865, at Durham Station, North Carolina, ending the last major organized military resistance. (General E. K. Smith surrendered about 3000 west of the Mississippi on 26 May.) The Consolidated Battalion 31-32 regiment marched to Washington D. C. via Richmond, Virginia, (the Confederacy capitol until 2 April) from 29 April to 20 May. They marched in the Grand Review up Pennsylvania Avenue on 24 May 1864. They were moved to Louisville, Kentucky and redesignated the 32nd Missouri Infantry on 20 June.

Bennett was court martialed for desertion from March to July 1863 and punished with loss of pay for the period absent and pay was stopped for transportation in the amount of $11.50. An Act of Congress, approved on 5 July 1884, removed all unauthorized absence charges against soldiers who subsequently had good records. First Lieutenant Beverly A. David of Company C had entered on Bennett's charges that Bennett had voluntarily rejoined his command, "since which time he has been a good and obediant soldier." Bennett was mustered out of Company D, 32rd Regiment, Missouri Infantry on 18 July 1865 at Louisville, Kentucky. Pay due Bennett was $21. (for 20 1/2 months less the court martial) plus $75. for increased enlistment bounty which was approved during the war.

Bennett returned to his nearly destitute (due to military and guerrilla operations in the area) family in Norman, Dent, Missouri. His eldest son John L., later described Bennett as being covered with bandages because he healed slowly. He said they only had a cup of turnip seeds to plant the next spring. They farmed for several years before moving to Short Bend township. In 1880, Bennett and Olive were living in Short Bend, Dent, Missouri. James, Bennett, Thomas, Elisha and Orin were still living at home at the time. He listed his occupation as "collier" and his parents' birth states as being North Carolina. Olive died 3 July 1880 and is buried at the Sligo Cemetery, Sligo, Dent, Missouri.

There are two other marriage records for Bennett. He married Margaret McCoy on 5 November 1882. He married Millie Taff on 20 July 1884, both in Dent County. I have not done any research on these two events.

When he applied for his pension, he made his declaration on 17 October 1891. He was a resident of Licking, Texas, Missouri. He stated that he was honorably discharged at St. Louis on 22 July 1865. "He is now totally unable to earn a support by reason of disease of the eyes, disease of back result fallin of the mumps and disease of the heart. That said disabilities are not due to his vicious habits and are to the best of his knowledge and belief permanent." S. A. Mitchell and Josiah Bradford appeared to vouch for him at that time. The original declaration for his pension stated that he contracted mumps while serving at Vicksburg. His application approval was delayed for over twelve years because he had stated he became ill in July 1863. The legal reviewer recommended disapproval because he determined that the mumps was contracted during his period of desertion. Subsequently, medical records showed that the mumps was contracted in September, almost two months after his return. With his application finally approved, Bennett received for his service $12. a month, which was to be retroactive to 22 October 1891.


Leta Murray Boucher's memories of Bennett were when he was an old man and lived with their family for a time. He chewed tobacco and she had the unsavory job of washing his beard. She also remembered him listening for the children and taking his cane and trying to trip them when they ran past him. She made a face when she told about it. He also enjoyed shocking family members with his colorful language.

Bennett died on 25 March 1902 at Birchtree, Shannon, Missouri. The following appears in the Birch Tree Free Record on Friday, 28 March 1902- "Bennett Murray, commonly known as Grandpa Murray, died in Birch Tree at the home of his son, Bennett Murray Jr., last Tuesday and was laid to rest in the Baptist Cemetery, Wednesday. He was born in Tennessee and came to Fredericktown, Missouri in an early day, where he married Miss Ollie Wood, with whom he lived till death parted them, some twenty years ago. He was a professed Christian and a member of the Baptist church. He was a Union soldier and served his country faithfully for three years and four months, as a private soldier in Company C, 32 Missouri Volunteers. He was in his 83rd year and had been blind an invalid for several years. He leaves six sons and one daughter do mourn his departure."

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Rossea Whitlock


Rossea was the third child of George W. and Nancy Ann Whitlock. She was born on 1 October 1841, according to the Whitlock Family Bible. Her birthplace was not recorded next to the date, but was probably Indiana. It was listed as Ohio on the 1850 and 1860 census. After that, every census said it was Indiana. Since her step-mother was born in Ohio, this could explain the first two census references to Ohio. In 1840, Rossie's father was enumerated on the census at Sullivan County, Indiana. That's the place that has my vote. On later census records, other Whitlocks lived at Fairbanks (A). It is at the north of the county and next to the Wabash River that separates Indiana from Illinois.

Her two older siblings were Abiah and Robert. When she was two years old Frances joined the little family. When Rossea was just five years old, her mother died on 2 November 1846. She would have naturally depended on her older sister Abiah, who was nine years old, to care for her at the death of their mother. Sadly, Abiah died on 15 March 1847, leaving the little family without a mother or a big sister. They were living at Canton, Fulton, Illinois (B) at the time. Canton is about 225 miles NW of Rossea's birthplace in Sullivan County, Indiana, and not far from the larger city of Peoria. Mother and daughter were buried next to each other at the Greenwood Cemetery in Canton. This must have been a difficult time for them.

Rossea's father provided another mother for the family shortly after that when he married Catherine Hilton on 12 September 1847. She appears as the mother of this family on the 1850 census, and if we did not have other sources, we would not know about Nancy Ann, the children's birth mother. They were living at Canton, and as you can see, George was a blacksmith with a fair amount of assets for the time.

Geo. W. Whitlock, age 35, M, blacksmith, $2000, VA; Catherine Whitlock, age 26, F, OH; Robert B. Whitlock, age 10, M, IN; Rossea H. Whitlock, age 8, F, OH; Frances E. Whitlock, age 6, F, IN.

On the 1860 census 18 year old Rossea was enumerated in the household of Hepalong Whitman. She could have worked there during the day, or been living with the family. She didn't marry until 23 February 1872, when she and Horatio Wellington traveled west 163 miles to Schuyler County, Missouri (C) and were married. Her husband was the brother of her sister Frances' husband, Horace. Their daughter, Pearl, was born that same year at Texas County, Missouri (D) where her parents now lived. The marriage didn't work out and by 1876, she was living with her parents and her daughter. Their neighbors were the Boucher family who came from Tennessee to Missouri in 1870.

Rossie married Samuel Boucher on 27 May 1877 in Texas County. She was 12 years older than her new husband. On the 1880 census they were living in Pierce, Texas, Missouri next door to her father, George Whitlock.
Sam Boucher, married, W, age 30, TN, farmer, TN, TN; Rossea, W, F, age 36, wife, housekeeper, IN, KY, IN; Luther, W, M, age 3, son, MO, TN, IN; Arthur, W, M, age 6/12, born Jan., son, MO, TN, IN.

Their three sons--Luther, Arthur, and Edward were each born two years apart beginning in 1878. Edward only lived for three years. By the time Edward died in 1885, the family had moved south 12 miles to Hutton Valley, Howell, Missouri.

Samuel died in 1897 at a cousin's home in what is now Chelsea County, Oklahoma, then Cherokee Lands. By this time Rossea and the boys had moved another five miles into the little town of Willow Springs, Howell, Missouri where the boys attended school. Rossie was listed there on the 1900 census.
Rossie Bousher, head, W, F, born Oct 1841, age 58, widow, 4 children/3 living, IN, KY, KY, farm; Luther Bousher, son, W, M, born Feb 1880, age 20, single, MO, TN, IN, painter.

Luther was actually in Wyoming at the time working as a carpenter, and the son at home was Arthur. In about 1903, Art got a job with the Northern Pacific Railroad. A year later his intended, Leta Murray, took the train from Willow Springs to Washington to marry him, and Rossea came with her. She spent most of the rest of her life living with Art and Leta in Washington. At the time of the 1920 census she was boarding with Maggie Harrison, in Spokane where Art and Leta lived. She was probably not at home because Leta was pregnant.

Rossea died on 11 August 1922 while visiting at the home of her son, Luther, at Grants Pass, Josephine, Oregon. It is sad to recount that she did not want to make that visit and was afraid she would die if she left home. Unfortunately, Leta, who was 41 years old, was pregnant and had a little toddler named Betty (Grandma Locke to us) to care for as well. So Rossea traveled to Oregon for six weeks while Leta had her baby, named William (Uncle Bill to us). When she got to Luther's house, she would not eat. She never did make the return trip back home to Spokane. It is also unfortunate that there is not a single photo of Rossea. It would have been nice to put these events together with a face.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Ann Pyne, 1790-1858


Ann Pyne was christened on 17 September 1790 at Topsham, Devon, England. Her parents were James and Elizabeth Pyne. At the age of 20, she married John Parker Gourd on 3 May 1810, also at Topsham. A native Celtic settlement, Topsham became a Roman port in the 1st century AD. It was designated a town by royal charter in 1300, and is now officially a suburb of Exeter. St. Margaret's Church in Topsham, dates back to the 10th century. It has been reconstructed several times in its original location as granted in 937 by King Athelstan, who gave "a parcel of land, i.e. a manse, which the vulgar called Toppesham, to the monastery Church of St. Mary and St. Peter in Exeter, for the cure of his soul, to have in eternal freedom so long as the Christian Church shall endure." It is a very picturesque place.

The family moved around a bit before settling in Chudleigh. Elizabeth was born at Christow in 1811 and John Parker at Broad Clyst in 1814. Mary Ann, Ann Jane, William James, Emma Maria, and William Soper were all born at Chudleigh. This is the same Chudleigh of the previous post for the Sealy family. In spite of their moves, they were never more than twelve miles from their original home of Topsham. The 1841 census enumeration listed the family.
John Gourd, age 50, smith; Ann, age 50; Mary, age 20, milliner; Emma, age 15, James, age 15, William, age 10.
William, their youngest child, is our ancestor. In 1851, they were listed again. By that time, the children had all left home.
John Parker Gourd, head, married, age 62, blacksmith, born Liskeard, Cornwall; Ann, wife, married, age 60, born Topsham, Devon.
Ann died 12 October 1858 at Torquay, Devon, England. It was their farthest distance from home, about 24 miles, and on the coast. Torquay is situated in an area known as the English Riviera because of its beaches and mild climate. It is likely they moved there to live with their daughter, Emma, in their old age. Ann's husband was enumerated on the 1861 census.
Living at 92 Lower Union St with Thomas Duke, head, married, age 36, tailor master, born Chudleigh; Emma M. Duke, wife, age 34, born Chudleigh- John Gourd, father-in-law, widower, age 72, smith, Liskeard.

Again in 1871, John was living with his daughter. He spent 20 years without the company of his wife, Ann; and that is a very long time.
Living at 5 Morboro Road w/Emma Duke- John P. Gourd, blacksmith, lodger, age 82, born Liskeard.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Halvor Thoreson, "husmand" at Ottem


Halvor was born on 10 September 1843 at Ottem, Sunndal, More-Romsdal, Norway. He was christened on October 10th of the same year. He was the illegitimate child of Randi Pedersdatter Ottem and Thore Olsen Hagen. He was his father's third illegitimate child with different persons, and his mother's first.
Halvor married Randi Knudsdatter on 21 May 1865 at Sunndal, More-Romsdal, Norway. She was also an illegitimate child. Halvor did not own the farm Ottem himself, but lived at a place called Ottem-lokken, which belonged to Ottem, also sometimes called Aakerlokken. He was a "husmand" or a cottager. All of their children were born at the Ottem farm. Together they had a large family of 12 children. Several of them came to the United States where they took the Ottem surname. In 1900, Randi was a widow at Sunndal, so we know that he died before 1900.

Monday, April 6, 2015

George W. and Nancy Ann Whitlock


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George W. Whitlock was born on 6 April 1815. On the 1850 census he said that he was born in Virginia, but by the 1880 census, he listed his birthplace as being in Kentucky, with his parents having been born in Virginia. His birthdate is recorded in the Whitlock Family Bible, along with others of his family.

I believe that his father was Robert Whitlock, who was living in Sullivan County, Indiana in 1830. At that time, he had two boys between the ages of ten and fifteen, and also two between the ages of fifteen and twenty. George was fifteen in 1830, so he fits into the family. In 1840, we find George on the census, still in Sullivan County, Indiana, as a married man with a small family consisting of himself, his wife, and two young children.

The same Robert Whitlock who was in Indiana in 1830, was in Simpson County, Kentucky in 1820, when George would have been just five years old. Simpson County was formed in 1819 from Warren County, where Robert was listed on the 1810 census for the area. Robert Whitlock had a large family that included five sons. In 1820, three of them were under the age of ten, as was George. Based on these findings, it is fairly safe to assume that George W. Whitlock was born in Warren County, Kentucky (A) and that Robert Whitlock was his father.

George's first wife was Nancy Ann, whose maiden name is unknown to us. She is also listed in the Family Bible. She was born on 19 April 1820, so she was five years younger than her husband. She was possibly born in Sullivan County, Indiana (B). They were married on 19 June 1836. and since they were listed on the 1840 census in Sullivan County, that is probably where they were married. He was 21 years old and she was just 16.

George and Nancy Ann had four children. Abiah, a girl, was born on 19 July 1837 in Indiana. Robert Burns was born on 27 September 1839, also in Indiana. They would have been born in Sullivan County. Rossea was born on 1 October 1841. On the 1880 census she listed Indiana as her birthplace, but an earlier census showed Ohio. The youngest daughter, Frances Eastes, was born on 6 September 1843 in Indiana.

Sometime between 1840 and 1846, the family moved to Illinois. While Sullivan County shared its western border with Illinois, this was not a short move, but took them to Canton, 238 miles NW of their Indiana home. On 2 November 1846, Nancy died in Canton, Fulton, Illinois (C), at the age of 26. Her oldest daughter Abiah, who was ten, followed her on 15 March 1847. They were both buried in the Greenwood Cemetery in Canton.

George was now a widower with a small family. He married Catherine Hilton on 12 September 1847 in Fulton County, Illinois. Catherine was born on 24 April 1819 in Ohio. Her parents were from Maine. She was 28 years old when she married George and became the mother of his little family. It is easy to imagine that she filled a very important place in their home since Nancy had died so recently. They did not have any children together. We can feel fortunate to have a record of this marriage since the Sullivan County courthouse was burned in 1850, destroying all of the county records.

George was a blacksmith. He must have been successful because his real property was valued at $2000 on the 1850 census. He was living in Canton at the time and remained there through the 1860 census. Longfellow's poem is descriptive of the life of a blacksmith. It was hard work that required strength. Everyone needed a blacksmith from time to time.

The Village Blacksmith
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Under a spreading chestnut-tree
The village smithy stands;
The smith, a mighty man is he,
With large and sinewy hands;
And the muscles of his brawny arms
Are strong as iron bands.

His hair is crisp, and black, and long,
His face is like the tan;
His brow is wet with honest sweat,
He earns whate'er he can,
And looks the whole world in the face,
For he owes not any man.

Week in, week out, from morn till night,
You can hear his bellows blow;
You can hear him swing his heavy sledge,
With measured beat and slow,
Like a sexton ringing the village bell,
When the evening sun is low.

And children coming home from school
Look in at the open door;
They love to see the flaming forge,
And hear the bellows roar,
And catch the burning sparks that fly
Like chaff from a threshing-floor.

He goes on Sunday to the church,
And sits among his boys;
He hears the parson pray and preach,
He hears his daughter's voice,
Singing in the village choir,
And it makes his heart rejoice.

It sounds to him like her mother's voice,
Singing in Paradise!
He needs must think of her once more,
How in the grave she lies;
And with his haul, rough hand he wipes
A tear out of his eyes.

Toiling,--rejoicing,--sorrowing,
Onward through life he goes;
Each morning sees some task begin,
Each evening sees it close
Something attempted, something done,
Has earned a night's repose.

Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend,
For the lesson thou hast taught!
Thus at the flaming forge of life
Our fortunes must be wrought;
Thus on its sounding anvil shaped
Each burning deed and thought.

In 1860, the Wellington family was living at nearby Buckheart. also in Fulton County. On 21 July 1867 Frances Eastes, the youngest Whitlock daughter, married Horace Wellington in Fulton County. Soon after, Rossea married Horatio Wellington, Horace's brother, on 23 February 1872. They were married in Schuyler County, Missouri, located in the northern part of that state and west of Fulton County where they lived. No further information has been found on their brother Robert.

By the 1870 census, George and Catherine had moved to Pierce, Texas, Missouri (D). George was 55 at the time and still a blacksmith. On the 1880 census they were still living in Pierce. George listed his occupation as "farmer" on this census, possibly meaning that he was retired from blacksmithing. On the census enumeration, their granddaughter, Pearl Wellington, was living with them or visiting. She was eight years old. George's daughter, Rossea, having been divorced from Horatio, had by that time remarried to Samuel Boucher on 27 May 1877. They were also living there at the time.

George’s grandson, Arthur Boucher, in a letter to Cecil Boucher, his brother Luther’s son, wrote, “G. W. Whitlock used to live with us . . . Never saw any of my grandparents except George W. Whitlock, my grandfather. What became of the big butcher knife Grandfather made to skin buffaloes with during the gold strike in California that he never got to use?” Since Cecil had the knife, it remains with that branch of the family. However, Cecil sent the family Bible to me.

Catherine died first on 24 October 1885 at the age of 66. George followed her on 28 August 1886. He was 71 years old. They are buried at the Bethel Cemetery in Summersville, Texas, Missouri.



Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Elizabeth Parker and Mathew Gourd


"Mathew Gourd of the Burrough of Liskeard in the County of Cornwall Gardiner & Elizabeth Parker of this Parish Spinster were married in this Church by Licence this first day of April 1779 by me William Hill Curate" Matthew and Elizabeth both signed; Witnesses were Richard Parker, Elizabeth Balle and William Roleston. From cousin Linda Nelson in England, "Next I looked to see if I could find a baptism at Christow for Elizabeth. There were very few records for Parker but this is a possibility--Baptism of Elizabeth, daughter of Richard and Mary Parker, 14 May 1754, born 25 April." Until we find out something more about Elizabeth, she is our end-of-the-line person. This christening seems to be a good possibility, particularly since Richard Parker was a witness to her marriage.

Christow is located in Devonshire, east of Cornwall in the SW corner of England. Photo thanks to www.visitdevon.co.uk for this lovely photo of Christow.

After their marriage in Christow (B), Matthew and Elizabeth returned to his home of Liskeard (A), 55 miles SW of Christow, where they raised a large family. Six of their children were christened at Liskeard, and two at Linkinhorne. Their children were Mary, William, Betsey, Sampson, John Parker, Matthew, Matthew, and Jane. The older Matthew lived less than a month. John Parker is our ancestor. Linkinhorne is a distance of 8.8 miles north of Liskeard.


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See also Matthew Gourd, 17 November.

Friday, March 27, 2015

Hester A. McClanahan

There is so much that we don't know about Hester, whose family called her Hetty. Thanks to an old Bible record, we do know that she was born on 27 March 1824, in Tennessee. We also know she had a sister named Hannah who was born in about 1818, also in Tennessee. They lived near the Tennessee River, where it meets the Hiawassee River in Meigs County.

There is an interesting history of Meigs County, Tennessee here. Organized in 1836, Meigs County is in the middle of the Tennessee Valley and lies along the Tennessee River, which makes up its western border. In the south, it is divided by the Hiwassee River. The Bouchers and the McClanahans lived near the Hiwassee River. This area belonged to the Cherokee Nation and was not available for settlement until 1836. It is the scene of the tragic Trail of Tears that displaced this people from their ancestral home.


Image credit for Trail of Tears by Robert Lindneux, 1942, to the Granger Collection, New York.

Hester and Elisha Boucher were married on 6 March 1845, probably in Meigs County or a nearby county in Tennessee. They had four children: Anna Jane, born 23 August 1846; William Robert, born 21 February 1848; Amanda Malvina born August 1852; and Samuel White, born 22 April 1854. Samuel is our ancestor.

Our first encounter with Hester is on the 1850 U. S. Census for Meigs County, Tennessee, as the wife of Elisha Boucher. The other McClanahan families living in the area were Mason and John, who were probably brothers to Hester and Hannah. In 1850, Elisha and Hester were living next door to his parents, William and Anna. It is interesting that he named his first two children Anna Jane and William. On the 1860 Limestone, Meigs County census, Elisha was still living next door to William. Elisha's personal property was valued at $375, while William had property worth $2000 and personal property of $942. It appears that William owned the land and they worked together to farm it.

They were still living in Meigs County during the Civil War. Tennessee seceded from the Union in 1861, although East Tennessee where they lived, did not favor the decision. There were few slaveholders in their area. Many men from Meigs County, like Elisha Boucher, enlisted in the Union Army. Elisha served from 1862 to 1865. Meigs County was not the scene of any battles, but it was the route used by both armies as they moved back and forth. Since it was located along the Tennessee River, and the river with its steamboats was important to the war, there was always an army marching through and camping in the area. Elisha's decision left Hester to care for the family and their home. It was a difficult time in that county, and when the war was over, the land was worth nothing, having been trampled down by both armies, every available piece of wood used for camp fires and not much of value remaining. The good news was that Elisha returned home to his family when the war was over.

On 24 February 1867, daughter Anna Jane married Joseph Romine in Bradley County, adjacent to Meigs County. Amanda and Harrison Hickman married on 20 March 1870. Harrison was from Bradley County.

Like many other Meigs County families who struggled after the Civil War, the Bouchers decided to move west. On 26 April 1870, Elisha deeded 135 acres of land in Meigs County to Robert Boucher. Then he took his family who were still living at home and joined a wagon train to Missouri. They started their trip on May 2nd. Along the way, he wrote letters to his children in Tennessee, telling them of the trip and encouraging them to also move to Missouri so that the family could remain together. He had a good team and wagon, and the resources, probably from the sale of his land, to pay the necessary fees and costs along the way. Their destination was Howell County, Missouri, where Joseph and Hannah McClanahan Bracket lived. One such letter was written on 15 May 1870 from Sumner County, Tennessee and is included here. Punctuation and capitalization have been added for easier reading, but the spelling is as he wrote it.
Dear son and daughter, with pleasur I take the present opportunity of writing you a few lines to let you know that we are well at present, hoping these few lines may reach you and find you all well and doing well. We started the 2nd day of May. We have been hindered some on the way. There is 7 waggons in our train. Miller has 4 and George Russel one, Martin Turner one and me one. We are 9 miles past Galiton on the Red River road. My expences has been more than I expected. Turnpikage cost me 25 cts evry 5 mile. I paid 435 turnpikes, feed for my team cost about 125 cts per day, beside the family. We travel from 14 to 18 miles a day. The fore part of las week was very wet. We got our thing wet. We are resting to day and suning our things that is wet.
Well I want you to write us and direct your letter to Joseph Brackett, West Plains PO, Howel Co, Misouri so we can hear from you as soon as we get there. We expect to stop in Howel Co and look at the country. If we like and can get land to suit us we will stop there. If not we will go further.
Well Jo, I want you and Jane to not go to any expence to fix for housekeeing untell you find out how things is in Misouri. If I like in MO I want you to come. Billy will come. Harry and Manda says they will come next fall. I want all my children together where I can see them once more. That is one cause of my sellout and move. It is ahard toil on me and Hetty.
We have 2 good yoke of young steers and a good waggon. We are getting along tollerable well. Will rest evry Sunday if we can get feed for our stock so we can stay. I wrote to Mandy last Sunday.
Well Jane, your mother is taking a great toil on herself to try to get to her children. Says she don't know how she can stand it tell fall and not see you and the children and Billy, but I don't see any chance for her to see you before fall. I will not have money enough to bear my expence further than Misouri. I will write to you when I get to MO and I will tell you what I think that country.
If I have no bad luck and you want to come to us I will come after you with my waggon. I have a good cover and tent cloth so we can sleep dry of a wet night. Write soon as you get this. I want to hear from you as soon as we get to Jo Bracket's. So I must close for this time. I have to write a letter to Billy to day.
Elisha & Hester Boucher to Jo & A. J. Romines-
Show this to Fate and Frank.
On the 1876 state census for Texas County, in South Central Missouri, Hester was living with her son, Samuel. Elisha got his family to Missouri, where he died on 14 March 1871. All of their children had come to Missouri as well. Joseph and Anna Jane Romine had six children and eventually settled in Willow Springs, Howell, Missouri. Amanda and Harrison Hickman were also near Hester on the 1876 census for Texas County. They had a large family of nine children and settled in Crawford County, Missouri. Samuel married Rossea Whitlock Wellington on 27 May 1877 in Texas County where she lived with her father, George Whitlock. She was a divorced woman with a daughter named Pearl. They had three sons together, one who died; and they also ended up in Willow Springs. Samuel and Rossea are our ancestors. William married Alberta Moore on 17 March 1878 and they had three children.

Hester lived to see all her children married. She died on 23 May 1879. Both she and her husband were Methodists all their lives.

Thursday, March 12, 2015

Charles L. Locke

This photo was taken at Tacoma, Pierce, Washington in about 1921. Charles L. Locke is holding his grandson, Ray, and standing next to his own son, Joel.

Charles L. Locke's life began on 12 March 1858 at Lynn, Randolph, Indiana. His parents were William F. Locke and his wife, Mary Jane Robbins. He was the fifth child in a family of eight children. He is listed on the census records for 1860 and 1870 with his parents, at Washington, Randolph, Indiana. Randolph County is located on the east border of the state next to Ohio.

Ellendale, founded in 1882, was the county seat for the new Dickey county that was organized in 1881 in the Dakota Territory. On 15 April 1883, Charles L. Locke married Mittie Duffy at Ellendale. Their marriage certificate lists his name as Carl L. Locke of Ellendale; hers, Miss Mittie A. B. Duffy of Ellendale. Dakota Territory was at the end of the "Dakota Boom" of the 1870's. Much of this growth was due to the expansion of railroads, especially the Northern Pacific Railroad whose main offices were in Minnesota. Wheat was the main crop in the Dakota Territory. During the 1880's as the price of wheat dropped and the area experienced a drought, the economy declined. It is possible that C. L. and Mittie thought to re-locate and then changed their minds and returned to Minneapolis.

Their children were John Henry, born 6 January 1884 and Joel Shirley, born on 4 November 1886; both at Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota. Their next child, a girl named Jessie Alice, was born on 11 November 1888, and died on 9 December 1889 at Minneapolis. A newspaper article of the time said,
"The youngest and only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Locke passed away on Monday evening, December 9, 1889, after a short illness. This being the first death in the family, it comes doubly hard and they have the sympathy of their many friends in this hour of trial. The link is severed and the chain is broken but God's will be done. Dec. 18th." (Corinna Cream)
In Minneapolis City Directories, C. L. Locke first appeared in 1880/1881, "Carl Locke, painter, b 1212 6th Ave N." It was the same for 1881/1882. In 1882/1883, he was listed as, "Carl L. Locke, letter carrier, b 629 N 13th." In 1883/1884, "Carl Lock, laborer, b Jackson N 3rd Ave NE." There was no entry for 1884/1885. In 1885/1886, 'C. L. Locke, millwright, r 3200 Hennepin Ave." In 1886-1887, "Carl L. Locke, clk PO, r 3200 Hennepin Ave." In 1888/1889, "C. L. Locke, health inspector eighth ward, r 3207 Holmes Ave." There were no entries after 1890. It appears that he did a little bit of everything, but was always employed during those years.

C. L. Locke was a Mason. "Brother Charles L. Locke petitioned Khurum Lodge No. 112 A. F. & A. M. for membership and was elected to receive his Degrees in Masonry. This he did, being Initiated an Entered Apprentice on April 13, 1888, Passed to the Fellow Craft Degree on May 4th, 1888; and Raised to the Degree of a Master Mason on May 18, 1888. On the date of his Master Mason Degree he made the following entry in our Lodge Register- C. L. Locke (his signature), age 30 year, born at Millwright, Indiana, Present residence, Minneapolis, Minnesota."

On 10 January 1891, C. L. and Mittie had a third son, Marion Damon, born at Annandale, Wright, Minnesota. Wright County was the home of Mittie's sister, Gert, who had her first child there just four months before Mittie gave birth to Marion. Annandale is about sixty miles NW of Minneapolis.

On 10 November 1894, C. L. received a letter from the Republican Campaign Committee, "In behalf of the Republican Campaign Committee I wish to thank you for the effective speeches which you made at various Republican Meetings, held in this City and County, during the past Campaign, and for your unselfish efforts in behalf of the success of our Party." From this little letter we know that he was a Republican and that he actively supported his political party.

Tragedy struck the family on 27 September 1899, when Mittie died of pulmonary tuberculosis at the young age of 36. She died at home at 811 West 31st Street. She had been sick for about four months, and had lived in Minneapolis all of her life. She was buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, Richfield, Hennepin, Minnesota. In the Minneapolis Tribune on 28 September 1899, page 11,
"LOCKE--In this city, September 27, 1899, Mrs. Charles L. Locke, aged 36 years. Funeral Friday at 2 p.m. from residence, 411 Thirty-first Street West."
C. L. was still living in Minneapolis on the 1900 census--
Chas. L. Locke, lodger, W, M, born Mar 1858, age 42, widow, born in Indiana, father born in North Carolina, mother born in New Jersey, contractor & builder.
John, his oldest son, age 16, was living with Gertie and her husband, Henry Scheyer at Corinna, Wright, Minnesota. John was handicapped, and spent a good part of his life living with Gertie. Joel, age 12 and our ancestor, was at the Minnesota State Training School at Goodhue, Red Wing, Minnesota, about 54 miles SE of Minneapolis. We can assume that Marion, the youngest, was also living with family elsewhere. It had to be a difficult time for the family, being split up like they were. In all his later years, he never remarried.

By 1910, C. L. had made the move to the west coast. He was living in West Roseburg, Douglas, Oregon, and working as a painter. In 1920, he was living with his son, Joel, in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon. He is pictured with Joel's two young sons, our ancestor Ray, and baby David. On the 1930 U. S. Census, he was living next door to another son, Marion, at Eugene, Lane, Oregon.

Charles L. Locke died at Eugene, on 28 April 1941. He was 83 years old. His usual occupation on the death certificate was listed as sign painter and paper hanger. The information was taken from the Lane county public welfare records. He was buried at Mt. Calvary Cemetery. "Funeral services for Charles L. Locke will be held from the St. Mary's Catholic Church Friday at 8 a.m. with interment in the Mt. Calvary Cemetery. The Veatch Chapel is in charge."